Portraying meursault from an existential eye

Even when he is directly involved in events, he is unable to get too caught up in them. Some readers would wonder, Where is the grief? He also refuses to simulate feelings that he does not possess, and thus he does not force himself to cry at his mother's funeral or to mourn her death too deeply.

Time and time again, history has shown us that humans fear most what they do not understand. Meursault creates his own philosophy of life making at the and peace with himself.

Meursault has been haunted by the sun throughout the novel. The idea of the divine, a supreme being, call it Jesus Christ, Allah or Buddha really find roots in common ground.

If God is omnipotent and all the evil is the result of his designs then what is the point in punishing man for evil. Risk and responsibility are combined in the image of Meursault with the overall purpose to illustrate existential ideas in the novel. His friendship with one Raymund Sintes leads him to a dramatic turn-of-events.

He is full of life even after the Portraying meursault from an existential eye of his mother and uses every chance to exhaust what life presents to him. After the chaplain leaves, Meursault enjoys a final, revelatory moment: For everything to be consummated, for me to feel less alone, I had only to wish that there be a large crowd of spectators the day of my execution and that they greet me with cries of hate.

He does not really understand why others get caught up in semantics, in trivialities, in lies when he believes that truth—even if it is a painful one—-is the only way to live life.

Meursault realizes he is a victim of circumstances and societal norms. The subsequent trial condemns him not so much for the murder as for his lack of commitment to the unspoken rules of society.

Finding it so much like myself—so like a brother, really—I felt that I had been happy and that I was happy again. This includes smoking and showing indifference at the vigil for his dead mother, going to the beach and sleeping with a woman the day after his mother's funeral, and forging a letter for his friend Raymond, who is a thug and a pimp.

He wrote The Stranger also translated as The Outsider around the same time as The Myth of Sisyphus, and the two books in many ways parallel one another. At the end of the novel, he comes to a full acceptance of his absurd position in the universe and cannot but conclude that he is happy.

In so many ways, his murderous reaction is unexpected and definitely uncalled for. Sisyphus is compelled by the God to a futile, eternal task. He is a man, stripped of hope, ambition and sense of future, trying to drain all the possibilities of life. Meursault tries to understand existence, its meaning and influence on past and present.

For example, Meursault claims: Symbolically Camus shows how society affects Meursault and he laments: It is his overly-truthful manner that finds him outcast from a society that is constantly playing mind-games. The Stranger or The Outsider.

Instead of trying to find a common frame of reference, our instincts tell us to shun, ostracize and criticize that which we perceive as different. If one were to feel and believe that after death nothing awaits us, no judgment nor paradise, then our lives—each second of it—would be too precious to waste on absurdity.

At the end of the novel, he comes to a full acceptance of his absurd position in the universe and cannot but conclude that he is happy. He wants to live with the certainties of this life, even if his only certainty is the death that awaits him.

For him, faith in a universe, which to him is an indifferent one, represses the true human potential for authentic and unconditional happiness. This moment emphasizes that to Meursault, his physical comfort and welfare is the ultimate aim.

Meursault as Existential Hero

The events that happen after the knife fight both perplex and fascinate readers; this is where the story really begins. It shows his worry about his own life and tries to avoid the possible unfavourable verdict that is death.

The Stranger (1942) by Albert Camus Essay Sample

Meursault is not interested in playing the game. To Meursault, believing in the divine and life after death automatically subscribes one to the idea of living by the rules; because if one were to violate these rules then the gift of eternity is lost. The Stranger tells the story of Meursault, who lives for the sensual pleasures of the present moment, free of any system of values.

Where are the emotions that make a being, well, human? His passion is evident in his enthusiastic pursuit of new pleasures and new experiences: Where are the emotions that make a being, well, human?Meursault is the embodiment of an existential human being in The Stranger.

In existentialism existence precedes essence and existentialist Jean-Paule Sartre coined. In this statement I states that as humans we are born without a purpose, no reason for being alive. ADITYA KARMAKAR, North Bengal University, English Department, Department Member.

The Stranger (1942) by Albert Camus Essay Sample

Studies Roland Barthes, Women in Love, and Feminism. Skip to main content Log In; PORTRAYING MEURSAULT FROM AN EXISTENTIAL EYE more. by ADITYA KARMAKAR. Research Interests: Albert Camus and Existentialism.

Download .pdf). PORTRAYING MEURSAULT FROM AN EXISTENTIAL EYE “Meursault is not a piece of social wreckage, but a poor and naked enamoured of the sun that leaves no shadow. Far from being bereft of all feeling, he is animated by passion that is deep because it is stubborn, a passion for the absolute, and for truth.” - Camus, “Preface” to “The Stranger”.

At NYU in the s, L’Etranger was taught as a model of existential alienation. The narrator of the novel, Meursault, was said to be so detached from his own emotions that he was indifferent even to the death of his mother. portraying meursault from an existential eye pdf PORTRAYING MEURSAULT FROM AN EXISTENTIAL EYE “Meursault is not a piece of social wreckage, but a poor and naked enamoured of the sun that leaves no shadow.

Meursault as Existential Hero Existentialism is a philosophy that centers on the point of freedom – freedom of making choices and bearing responsibility for consequences.

Existentialism suggests accepting the risk and responsibility of human choices and following the commitment.

Download
Portraying meursault from an existential eye
Rated 3/5 based on 81 review